Why does superfluid helium creep up surfaces?

Helium, which turns into liquid at about 4.2 Kelvin, can be held in a container like a beaker due to gravity. But when it is cooled further to below approximately 2 Kelvin, it creeps up the surface of the beaker and leak. At this temperature, liquid helium is called as superfluid due to its odd properties. For example, the liquid's viscosity becomes nearly zero. Because of that, the fluid can flow very easily even as a result of the smallest pressure. On one hand, a thin liquid helium film will appear as the liquid wet the surface of the beaker. On the other hand, liquid helium has smaller dielectric permittivity than any other medium (except vapour), which results in a negative Hamaker constant and a repulsive van der Waals force across the film. This will act to thicken the film and make the liquid helium flow from the bottom of the beaker to its surface and thus leak. 

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